Metalworking Fluid Issues

COMMON METALWORKING FLUID ISSUES

By using the proper metalworking fluid for your process or metalworking operation, you will maximize the fluids’ life, effectiveness and performance resulting in significant cost savings, reduced waste and downtime and ultimately higher profits.

Some of the issues that we resolve daily to assist our customers to be more productive, efficient, profitable, and environmentally responsible.

COOLANT CONTAMINATION

Rust preventatives, tramp oils, cutting oils, greases, metal fines and chips, etc. are all substances that find its way into machine tool sumps reducing its life and effectiveness.

COOLANT SEPARATION

A split emulsion results with the oil phase floating on top and is typically caused by hard water or a mineral build-up in the coolant reservoir.

CUTTING OIL DILUTION

Mixtures of lube/hydraulic oils can contaminate cutting oil sumps reducing its effectiveness and performance.

CUTTING OIL EFFECTIVENESS

Continued use of cutting oils without replenishment of additives can cause reduced tool life, poor finishes, and a reduction in acceptable parts.

DIE PICKUP/PART SCORING

Weld-on of metal on dies or excessive scoring on stamped parts can be an indication of a lack of lubrication or use of an inappropriate lubricant.

TOOL LIFE

Reduced usability of tools, dies, inserts, drills, etc. can negatively affect finished parts and profitability and increase down time.

ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS

By extending the effective life of your metalworking fluids, waste disposal can be significantly reduced. Chlorinated paraffins, biodegradable fluids and coolant biocides are also issues which need constant vigilance to insure employee safety and compliance with regulatory and waste disposal agencies.

FOAMING

In many of today’s high pressure systems, foam may form when oils and coolants are severely agitated. Defoamers are typically used to control this condition.

MISTING

Droplets of coolant and oils can be suspended in the air during metalworking operations creating a potential employee health hazard.

RUSTING

Ferrous metal corrosion can occur when water-dilutable coolants are cut too much or coolant has separated into its oil and water phases.

STAINING

Surface discoloration can occur both with cutting oil and coolant systems when machining non-ferrous metals or aluminum. Inhibitors can usually be added to prevent this condition.

Scroll to Top